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Guide To Your Changing Body During Pregnancy, 1st Trimester.

by | October 31, 2018

You will go through lots of physical and emotional changes to your body during pregnancy. It can be overwhelming. Understand the changes you might experience and how to take care of yourself during this exciting time.

Here’s what you can expect.

Some of the changes in your body during pregnancy will be glaringly obvious. Your periods will stop, your breasts may become sore and lumpy and the areas around your nipples may darken. A nice supportive and comfortable bra, like a nursing bra, will help.

You may also experience mood changes at the most random times – this is very normal. Be sure to focus on yourself. Talk about your feelings with your friends, family and co-workers. Eat small meals regularly and often, and stay active. If you feel down for longer than seven days and things that used to give you joy no longer do, you may have perinatal depression, give your healthcare provider a call if you’re feeling this way.

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It’s normal to feel excitement, fear or uncertainty about impending parenthood. Share your feelings with others and spend time with new parents or a pregnancy support group. You can call your public health office, ask your healthcare provider or check your phone book for information on pregnancy and perinatal support groups in your area.

Fatigue

During early pregnancy, levels of the hormone progesterone soar causing you to feel tired and sleepy; rest whenever you can. Have periods of activity and then of rest; stop before you become overtired. Eat small meals several times a day and drink plenty of water. If you’re working, try to rest on your breaks and at lunchtime

Headaches

Headaches are common and usually due to hormonal and postural changes. Practice good posture. Eat small, nutritious meals several times a day. Drink plenty of water. Avoid activities that cause eyestrain. Get plenty of sleep at night and rest during the day. Apply a cool washcloth to your forehead and the back of your neck. Drink two cups of water and take some acetaminophen (always consult with your healthcare provider before taking any medicines while pregnant and or nursing.)

Talk to your healthcare provider if your headache doesn’t go away

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Frequent Urination

Pregnant women pee more often, it’s completely normal and due to the increased fluids in your body. Drink water, milk, and 100 percent juice instead of coffee, tea, or soda. This is one of the most common changes to your body during pregnancy.

Increased Vaginal Secretions

Vaginal secretions are thin and milky.
Wear small pads, cotton underwear, and loose breathable pants.
Bathe often as you don’t want an infection.
Contact your healthcare provider if there is itchiness or frothy, smelly, or colored discharge.

Heartburn

Pregnancy hormones relaxing the valve between your stomach and esophagus can allow stomach acid to leak into your esophagus, causing heartburn. To prevent heartburn, eat small, frequent meals and avoid fried foods, citrus fruits, chocolate, and spicy or fried foods.

Light-Headedness

Stand up slowly.
Eat regularly and often.

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Food aversions

When you’re pregnant, you might become more sensitive to certain odors and your sense of taste might change. Like most other symptoms of pregnancy, food preferences can be chalked up to hormonal changes.

Shortness of Breath

This is usually normal, but check with your healthcare provider if you have a family history of heart problems.

Constipation

High levels of the hormone progesterone can slow the movement of food through your digestive system, causing constipation. Iron supplements can add to the problem. To prevent or relieve constipation, include plenty of fiber in your diet and drink lots of fluids, especially water and prune or other fruit juices. Regular physical activity also helps.

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Nausea and Vomiting.

Morning sickness, which can strike at any time of the day or night, often begins one month after you become pregnant, and is one of the most common changes to your body during pregnancy. Eat slowly and in small amounts every one to two hours. Choose foods that are low in fat. Avoid foods or smells that make your nausea worse. Drink plenty of fluids. Foods containing ginger might help. While morning sickness is quite normal due to hormonal changes, if you’re experiencing severe nausea and vomiting call your healthcare provider as it may be something more serious.

What other changes to your body during pregnancy did you notice? Let us know in the comments below! 

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Julie Nealon

Associate Editor, New York USA | Contactable via [email protected]

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