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Momo Challenge, Suicide Game Appearing in Young Children’s Online Videos

by | February 26, 2019

Police in the UK are warning parents about Momo challenge- suicide game that is targeting children through online games and videos. The Momo character who first appeared last year lurks behind innocent-looking games in the hopes of encouraging kids to cause self-harm while parents are distracted.

Momo Challenge, Suicide Game Appearing in Young Children’s Online Videos
By Larina Marina/shutterstock
Momo Challenge, Suicide Game Appearing in Young Children’s Online Videos

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Momo Challenge, Suicide Game Appearing in Young Children’s Online Videos

The creepy character lurks behind kids online games and challenges the gamer into acts of self-harm. In some cases in Europe, and around the globe, the acts have reportedly led to accidental suicide. The menacing character has appeared on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Whatsapp and on the game Minecraft and encourages young users to make contact with Momo via WhatsApp. It has also been said to appear during harmless YouTube videos popular with young children.

The female character, in the momo challenge suicide game, with a distorted face, bulging eyes, and an eerie grin has encouraged kids to send it a message through Whatsapp where distressing instructions are given. The character also tells the child that it’s a secret and not to tell their parents.

There has been several reports on social media of people from across Northern Ireland seeing the character pop up while their children played a game or watched a video. One mother in Northern Ireland said she discovered Momo on her seven-year-old daughters iPad, despite having parental controls set up.

Police in Northern Ireland is asking that parents be vigilant in supervising their children while they’re playing online games and to be extra mindful of the videos they watch on YouTube. PSNI are encouraging parents to ensure that the devices their children have access to are restricted to age-appropriate content.

The NSPCC are asking that parents make children aware of the risks online. They have published advice and guidelines for parents on their website.

Help can also be found at New Aware – a guide for parents on social media and gaming apps.

Parents can contact the NSPCC Helpline on 0808 800 5000.


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Julie Nealon

Associate Editor, New York USA | Contactable via [email protected]

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