Dealing With Toddler Behavior, Tantrums And Getting Bossy

by | September 4, 2018

Coping with toddler behavior while also trying not to lose your mind is never an easy task, especially when they start getting bossy.

As toddlers develop they absorb and mimic all kinds of adult behavior, like how to eat with a knife and fork, or how to dress themselves, or that joyful part where they start shouting swear words in the grocery store while all you can do is look horrified and pretend it wasn’t you that they heard it from. When kids begin to experiment with power and how words can manipulate people it can be hard not to lose your cool. Combining this behavior with a fondness for rules and order and you may find yourself with a little dictator on your hands, who seems set on ruling over friends and family.

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Dealing with this kind of toddler behavior requires patience and consistency. Try not to give in to or reward bossy behavior. If your child begins to demand something, insist that they ask again in a nicer way. Prompt them to say please and thank you, learning manners young will make everyone’s lives easier, and having good manners will bring them a long way in the future. If your child is being unkind to their friends or siblings, turn the tables on them and ask how they would feel if the friend or sibling had treated them that way.

Now that your toddler’s language skills are also exploding, they can make it all too clear when they don’t like something, especially food. Coping with this type of toddler behavior can be difficult, and it can be tempting to give up on introducing new foods. Most children need to be offered a new food anywhere between 10-20 times before they’ll accept it as being nice.

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If a child learns at a young age that they don’t have to even try a food, it will lead to problems later in life, like when they go to school, or a friends house. They will have a harder time trying to get a balanced diet and will end up eating more ‘boring’ foods. Start with small portions and try not to get into a battle about it. After all, there’s always tomorrow to try them with the new food, just keep offering it.

Coping with toddler behavior when they get to the stage of learning to say no and having their own voices can be difficult, but just remember that it doesn’t last forever. Soon they’ll be all grown up and you’ll be wondering what happened to your little monster as they head off for their last days of school.

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Alex Jones

Associate Editor, USA | Contactable via inquiries@raisevegan.com

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