Zika Virus Pregnancy, What You Should Know This Summer

by | May 25, 2018

What you should know this summer about Zika virus pregnancy.

This mosquito-borne illness can threaten your unborn baby’s health. Here’s what you need to know about the Zika virus.

Zika surfaced only over one year ago from South America, and Brazil was affected, with tens of thousands of infants suffering severe birth defects, such as brain damage, in utero if their moms contracted the virus.

Meanwhile, over 3,000 cases of travel-related Zika diseases are reported over the United States, with 26 of domestic ailments being sexually transmitted. At September 8, as many as 731 pregnant women show signs of becoming infected with Zika in the United States and an extra 1,156 pregnant women are infected from Puerto Rico, the CDC reports.

If you are pregnant–or attempting to conceive– the Zika virus is most likely a concern at this time, and with great reason: This mosquito-borne virus isis making terrifying progress into the USA and possibly catastrophic consequences for pregnant women and their infants. The number of Zika virus pregnancy cases is still growing.

What Exactly Is The Zika Virus?

The Zika virus is an insect-borne disorder which could be mostly transmitted by contaminated Aedes mosquitoes, the identical type that spreads dengue and yellow fever. The title stems from the Zika Forest in Uganda – where monkeys together with the virus were first discovered in 1947.


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Why Should We Worry?

Most recently, scientists have discovered that the Zika virus may lead to glaucoma in babies who have been exposed in utero; it’s additionally been associated with hearing loss, eyesight difficulties, and diminished development in babies, according to the CDC.

The entire spectrum of results for babies infected with Zika is still being analyzed, but we do understand even infants who don’t show first signs of birth defects may develop damage¬†that is, unfortunately, not reversible. Though the Zika virus stays in the bloodstream of an infected individual for a couple days to a week, based on the CDC, there is no current evidence to indicate that it poses a threat of birth defects in future pregnancies.

And Zika will not cause infections in an infant that is conceived after the virus has left the host. For the comparatively few men and women who show indications of a Zika disease, the disease is often quite mild. But in a pregnant woman, the consequences may be devastating, and may result in the loss of the pregnancy or a baby born with a small head and mind –a condition called microcephaly, says Edward R.B. McCabe, M.D., Ph.

Microcephaly may be related to developmental defects, mental retardation, and seizures, and sometimes could be deadly. A Zika virus pregnancy can have devastating consequences.


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Why Is It Unsafe?

Five pregnancy losses, as a consequence of Zika also have been reported. Until lately, Zika virus had only been associated with serious risk to the embryo –it was not demonstrated that the consequences were really due to it. But today, the information has shifted and health officials may report an immediate connection between Zika and microcephaly. Nonetheless, there are lots of unknowns–such as how probable it is an infection in a pregnant woman is going to probably be passed on to her fetus. Having a zika virus pregnancy has a lot of risks to your unborn child.

If some fetuses are infected but do not develop microcephaly, just how frequently pregnancy loss might happen in anticipating women with Zika virus, and if pregnancy makes women more vulnerable to the virus,” states Marjorie Treadwell, M.D., manager of the Fetal Diagnostic Center in the University of Michigan and a maternal and fetal medicine specialist.

 

How Is Zika Virus Transmitted?

If a mosquito bites and pulls blood from somebody who’s infected, the insect becomes contaminated and then proceeds to bite other men and women.

Zika may also be transmitted sexually, through oral, anal or vaginal sex, according to the CDC. It is essential to note transmission can happen even when an infected individual isn’t symptomatic.

In rare cases, the Zika virus might be passed together using a blood transfusion, according to the CDC.

Zika virus was found in bronchial tissues, amniotic fluid, full-term babies, also in the placenta, according to ACOG, and trace quantities of the virus also have been found in breast milk, but since the number is tiny, it is not likely to pose a hazard. Oral ailments of Zika have not been recorded and, if you were to happen, it would probably be the exact same mild variation as found in adults.


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What Are The Symptoms?

You may feel like it’s akin to suffering from a mild case of the flu, which includes low-grade fever, headaches, body rashes, joint and muscle soreness, and conjunctivitis (pink eye). Symptoms can last several days per week.

Just 20 percent of individuals infected with the Zika virus may actually become sick, reports Cynthia Moore, M.D., Ph.D., of the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), including,”We do not know now when elderly women are more likely to develop symptoms when infected.”

Do I Get Tested?

If you might have been subjected either through go to an energetic Zika infection area, if you reside in an active region, or in the event that you might have been exposed through sexual contact, then your physician will order urine or blood tests to find out whether you’re positive for the virus, or even when you are not showing symptoms.

In particular, the guidelines advocate women who are pregnant, and who have been to areas with understood continuing Zika transmission be tested between 2 and 12 weeks when they have returned straight away when symptoms are present. The CDC also recommends that pregnant women without symptoms but that reside at a Zika-affected region be tested for the virus at the beginning of prenatal care in addition to later on, in the middle point of their next trimester. Even in the event that you don’t display symptoms, your infant ought to be analyzed, usually during an ultrasound. If there are worries after an ultrasound, amniocentesis might be the next step.

Federal health officials are advocating that infants be tested if the mother has seen an affected region and also reveals symptoms of this Zika virus. Your physician needs to speak to a health section for information regarding testing for Zika. Even in the event that you don’t display signals, your infant ought to be analyzed, usually during an ultrasound. If there are worries after an ultrasound, amniocentesis might be the next step.

Precautions to take:

  • Wearing shirts with long sleeves and pants, rather than shorts
  • Using bug spray with DEET, which is safe for pregnant and nursing women (check the label and follow the directions carefully
  • Treating clothes with permethrin, a type of insecticide
  • Ridding your home of any free-standing water

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