Credits: bbernard/ Shutterstock

Screen Time Guide for Children by World Health Organization May Shock You

by | April 30, 2019

Whether it’s a smartphone, television, gaming console or a computer, the time you and your family spend in front of screens is probably more than you think it is. Although we have tips for you to manage your kid’s screen time and even ways to help you manage your own, you’ll have to cut back more than you had initially thought. How much will your children have to cutback? For those four and under, the duration spent in front of the screen shouldn’t exceed one hour per day.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has published a screen time guide titled, “To grow up healthy, children need to sit less and play more,” outlining what they deem as optimal concerning a child’s physical activity and the duration spent in front of a screen. The results may come as a shock to you.

Screen Time Guide
Credit: Kelly Sikkema/ Unsplash

You might also like:

Screen Time Guide for Children by World Health Organization May Shock You

With three categories supplying age-based recommendations (infants under one-year-old, children aged 1-2, and children aged 3-4) on time spent doing physical activity, time spent restrained, and time spent sleeping, parents everywhere are seeing how their children’s current lifestyle aligns with what WHO advises. Unfortunately, many are astonished by what has been put out: a cap of one hour per day spent in front of the screen for those under the age of five years old.

Credit: Corey Motta/ Unsplash
Screen Time Guide for Children by World Health Organization May Shock You

Throughout the three age groups, there are a few key similarities such as not being retrained (in a stroller, for example) for more than one hour at a stretch and hosting a variety of durations spent on low-intensity physical activity. The biggest commonality is the emphasis on sedentary time, especially that spent in front of a screen, being extremely limited and for those aged one year, eliminated.

For one-year-olds, sedentary screen time (such as watching TV or videos, playing computer games) is not recommended. For those aged two years, this should be no more than one hour; less is better

To grow up healthy children need to sit less and play more/ World Health Organization

Instead of sedentary time being spent in front of a screen, WHO recommends interactive activities such as reading or puzzles to promote healthy brain development and quality learning time. In the long run, WHO thinks this may be a factor in combatting potential child obesity, a crisis that has struck many families worldwide.

How do you work to manage your family’s screen time? Will this screen time guide inspire you to cut back on the duration your kids spend in front of the screen? Let me know in the comments below.


Get Raise Vegan Magazine for $29.40 for Six Months!
GET MY ISSUES
Gabriella Anaya

News Editor | Limoges, France | [email protected]

laptop

Comments

Leave a Comment