Credit: by g-stockstudio/ Shutterstock

Analysis Shows Weight-Loss Surgery can Cause Complications During Pregnancy and Birth

by | May 6, 2019

Weight-loss surgery can cause complications during pregnancy and birth? Apparently yes, says a study.

According to the European Association for the Study of Obesity and published online by Science News, there appears to be an evident link between women who have had weight-loss surgery and certain pregnancy and birth complications. Have you or someone you know undergone weight-loss surgery in the past and are or are trying to become pregnant? Keep reading to know about this possible link to be aware of.

Credit: Tanya Yatsenko/ Shutterstock
Weight-Loss Surgery can Cause Complications During Pregnancy?

You might also like:

Analysis Shows Weight-Loss Surgery can Cause Complications During Pregnancy and Birth

At 2019’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO) that had taken place in Glasgow, Scotland this April 28 through May 1, the notion that women who have previously undergone weight-loss surgery have a higher risk for certain pregnancy and birth complications. Presented by Zainab Akhter, the Ph.D. student who had led the research done on the topic, spoke to this at the conference.

Our findings indicate that women with a history of bariatric surgery, and in particular, gastric bypass surgery, are at much greater risk of several adverse perinatal outcomes. These women require specific preconception and pregnancy nutritional support…Health professionals also need training and guidance to be able to provide the right advice.

Zainab Akhter/ ECO, Glasgow, UK April 28-May 1, 2019
By Johan Larson/ Shutterstock
Analysis Shows Weight-Loss Surgery can Cause Complications During Pregnancy

The study covered a large group of women, the group looked at over 14,800 pregnancies where the moms-to-be had had previous weight-loss surgery in comparison to nearly 4 million pregnancies where the moms-to-be did not undergo previous weight-loss surgery. The analysis also took into account outside factors such as age, whether or not the subject smokes, and history of diabetes.

The results that Zainab and his team found during the study? As for women who have had weight-loss surgery, their unborn child was 57% more likely to be born premature, 29% more likely to be born with congenital anomalies, and they were 38% more likely to suffer from perinatal death.

Zainab concludes that although it is not quite yet clear how (if at all) a previous weight-loss surgery could affect the development of a fetus, but it is, however, clear that micronutrient deficiencies (which can lead to future problems in the pregnancy) are much more common in both men and women who have had a bariatric surgery in the past.

How do you feel about this analysis linking weight-loss surgery with potential pregnancy and birth complications? Let me know in the comments below.


Get Raise Vegan Magazine for $29.40 for Six Months!
GET MY ISSUES

Gabriella Anaya

News Editor | Limoges, France | [email protected]

laptop

Comments

Leave a Comment